Pool Table Games

Protect & Transport Your Cue Stick With A Good Pool Cue Case

Are you in the market for a high-quality pool cue case? If so, you have come to the right place. Here we have reviewed several of our editor’s favorites when it comes to the best pool cue cases currently available on the market, and highlighted the pros and cons associated with each case.

We have also included a Pool Cue Case Buying Guide, in which we have discussed—at length—the many factors to consider when buying one of these handy items.

Best Pool Cue Stick Cases for the Money (2018)

Last update on 2019-10-19 at 03:55 / Affiliate disclaimer / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

How To Properly Put Your Pool Cue In a Case

Not sure of the best way to put the cue stick into the case? There is a right and a wrong way to do it, and you definitely need to make sure that you’re not damaging the tip of your cue stick when carrying it in the case. Check out the video below for some tips.

Eastpoint Soft Cue Case – best cheap soft cue case

Made for easy transport and storage, the Eastpoint Soft Cue Case has everything you need to protect your precious pool cue. A 1 x 1 case that is padded and lined to defend against scratches and dings, the pool cue case features a body of durable rip-stop nylon with an easy-zip closing apparatus.

Eastpoint Soft Cue Case

The case is designed to fit all pool cues measuring 58 inches or less, and includes one large outside pocket for carrying billiards related equipment and personal effects.

Pros

  • Padded Lining. The padded lining on the Eastpoint Soft Cue Case will keep the cue safe and protected.
  • Lightweight. Made of lightweight nylon, this pool cue case is one of the lightest of its kind on the market today.
  • Outside Pocket. The outside pocket on the Eastpoint Soft Cue Case makes it convenient to carry equipment and personal effects.

Cons

  • Not as protective as hard cases. The soft nylon Eastpoint Soft Cue Case does not offer the same level of protection as a hard case.
  • Velcro pocket. The pocket closes with an iffy Velcro attachment rather than a zipper or snap.

Iszy Billiards 1×1 Hard Pool Cue Carrying Case – best value cue stick case

The 1 x 1 Pool Cue Carrying Case from Iszy Billiards is a hard case with vinyl covering that easily holds 1 butt and 1 shaft of a two-piece pool cue. Offering much more protection than soft pool cue cases, this product is the perfect case for traveling from game to game, without ever having to worry about compromising the billiards stick.

Iszy Billiards 1x1 Hard Pool Cue Billiard Stick Carrying Case, (Several Colors Available)

The Iszy Billiards 1×1 Hard Pool Cue Carrying Case includes an adjustable shoulder strap and a convenient pocket for carrying chalk, extra tips, powder, conditioner and more. Measuring 31 and ¼ inches, the cue can easily accommodate up to a 60 inch two-piece stick; and it includes a cloth divider to keep the butt and shaft from damaging each other.

Pros

  • Cloth divider. The cloth divider in this pool cue case offers a great method for keeping the back end and shaft of the cue separated.
  • Many styles available. The Iszy Billiards 1×1 Hard Pool Cue Carrying Case is available in many stylish designs.
  • Can carry other items. The pool cue case can also be used in a pinch to carry and protect a bass or violin bow.

Cons

  • Zipper can break over time. The zippered compartment on the Iszy Billiards 1×1 Hard Pool Cue Carrying Case can break over time.
  • Heavy. The hard Iszy Billiards pool cue case is much heavier than most soft pool cue cases.

Casemaster Q-Vault Supreme Cue Case – #1 top pick

A top-of-the-line billiards product, the Casemaster Q-Vault Supreme Cue Case is a hard pool cue case with a smooth leatherette covering . Its hard exterior is designed to protect your billiards stick from scratches and bumps, and the fully lined interior provides a cozy and easy-to-retrieve compartment for your cue.

Casemaster Q-Vault Supreme Cue Case

The shoulder strap on the Casemaster Q-Vault Supreme Cue Case is padded to protect against irritation; and the removable accessory pouch provides an ideal spot for carrying chalk, powder and other pool accessories.

Pros

  • Stylish exterior. The hard shell and jet black leatherette covering will strike fear into your opponents when carrying this bag.
  • Great shoulder strap. The padded shoulder strap on the Casemaster Q-Vault Supreme Cue Case sets it apart from most other cases.
  • Removable pouch. The removable pouch on this model allows players to bring their accessories out where they won’t take up too much room.

Cons

  • Premium priced. As you might expect, the great features on this case have led to a high price tag that may rule it out for the budget conscious player.
  • Zipper may stick. A few reviewers have had early problems with the zipper sticking on this bag.

Pool Cue Case Buying Guide

If you’re pool cue is important to you—as we’re sure it is—you will definitely need a pool cue case that completely protects your pool stick when it’s in your home, your car, on an airplane or train, or on any other type of transportation you rely on when traveling back and forth between games, including walking. To help you find the most ideal pool cue case for your needs and preferences, below we have compiled this Pool Cue Case Buying Guide, in which we have outlined some of the more crucial factors you will need to consider as you shop for your next great case.

How Many Cues Will Your Case Need to Carry?

Pool cue cases come in a variety of styles and sizes, so the first question you will need to ask yourself is “how many pool cues will you be carrying in your case?” If you are like the majority of current amateur players, you may only need space for one pool cue—at this time—but there may come a time when you need to carry more than one cue. When that time comes you will first need to understand what the numbers mean on those pool cue case advertisements.

Pool cue cases are often advertised as a 1 x 1 case, 1 x 2 case, 3 x 3 case, etc. And understanding these numbers is crucial to the purchasing process. Let’s look at an example: When a pool stick case is advertised as a 1 x 1 case, the first number in that expression refers to the numbers of “butts” the case can hold. The butt of the cue is the back end when a two-piece cue has been disassembled. The second number refers to the numbers of shafts—the front end of the cue—that same case can hold.

If you currently own just one pool cue, there may come a time when you want to purchase additional sticks for various reasons. Professionals, for example, often carry a second cue for breaking or jumping, so as not to jeopardize their primary cue. Hence, they need a 2 x 2 case. Others may just use a house stick for those types of shots, and thus only need a 1 x 1 pool cue case. Finally, some of the fancier pool cues now come with an extra shaft for performing breaks or specialty shots. In this case, a 1 x 2 case would be the most appropriate choice….you get the picture.

Before you shop, count up the number of butts and shafts you are likely to carry and you’ll known what type of pool cue case to purchase.

Hard Case vs. Soft Case

Are you looking for a hard pool cue case or a soft pool stick case. Both have their advantages, but the real question you need to ask yourself when pondering this decision is “what type of playing do you plan to do?”

In general, hard cases, as you might imagine, provide a greater degree of protection for your pool cue. If you plan to travel somewhere to play, a hard case will prevent your stick from getting crushed or banged around when in the cargo hold. Another great thing about most hard cases is that you can stand them up next to the table as you play to hold your cue between shots. However, hard cases also tend to be heavier than soft cases. As such, they put more strain on your shoulder when carrying them with the strap. Also, if there are weight restrictions with your luggage, a hard pool cue case may cause you to go over the limit, while a soft pool cue case would give you some extra room for another pair of shoes or even another cue case.

Soft pool cue cases are lighter, but in many cases their makeup also makes them more expensive (genuine leather cases, etc.). And, as stated, you may be risking the integrity of your pool stick by entrusting it to a soft case.

In the end, it all comes down to preference, comfort and protection—dancing between these three aspects until you find a case that matches your personality and playing style.

How Much Other Stuff Do You Need to Carry

As we mentioned in the preview, pool cue cases come in a variety of styles, ranging from very basic to super elaborate. The former type usually just has enough room for the butt and shaft end of your two-piece pool cue and little else. On the other hand, the latter, more elaborate pool cue case may have any number of interior and exterior compartments, including zippered and buttoned pouches. These elaborate cases provide enough room for a lot of essentials, such as chalk, powder, gloves, shaft conditioner, bridge heads, extensions and more. These pockets and compartments can also be used for essentials like wallets, keys, cell phones and many other pieces of personal property.

We recommend you take an inventory of the “usual” equipment you intend to bring and shop for a pool cue case that will accommodate everything you need.

About Handles and Straps

Most pool cue cases come with some exterior apparatus that helps you carry the case from game to game. Some of the hard pool cue cases with pockets have just a handle, situated about midway on the case, where you would carry your pool cue like a suitcase while keeping your equipment in its place. Others have a fully adjustable strap that enables you to sling the case from your shoulder.

If you do elect for a strap-like carrying method, make sure the strap contains some type of padding where it meets your shoulder. This will reduce any irritation from carrying it and is especially helpful when your pool cue case is fully loaded with cues and gear.

Last Word

When picking out a pool cue case, regardless of the size, material, extra compartments, handles or straps, the real key is to choose one that is well made and one with which you are comfortable—one that is easy to carry, holds all your required gear, and is designed in such a way that retrieving your cues is a simple process.

About the author

Sam Frazier

As a child of the 80's, my fondest gaming memories are playing Pitfall, Frogger, Kaboom! and Chopper Command on our old Atari 8600. These days I've been rocking the Nintendo Classic and learning some new card and board games with the family.

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